Tag Archives: Republicans

Good deal, bad deal?

Conservatives have yet to decide whether the bipartisan tax bill was a Republican win or loss:

Grover Norquist: “Every R voting for Senate bill is cutting taxes and keeping his/her pledge.”

The Heritage Foundation: “[T]he bipartisan deal will actually raise taxes on the vast majority of American workers.”

Dave Camp (R-Mich): “[The bill] is the largest tax cut in American history.”

Kevin Glass: “77% of Americans Will Pay Higher Taxes.”

Tom Cole (R-OK): “We didn’t get everything we wanted, but when you can make 85% of the Bush Tax Cuts secure for 98% of the American people, give everybody rate certainty, and basically take the revenue piece off the table in our negotiations going forward, we ought to take this deal right now.”

Stephen Dinan and Sean Lengell: “The bill is a tremendous victory for President Obama, who won almost everything he sought in the deal /…/”

William Kristol: “And politically, Republicans are escaping with a better outcome than they might have expected, and President Obama has gotten relatively little at his moment of greatest strength.”

Charles Gasparino: “[Obamas is] enacting the largest tax hike this country has seen in decades /…/”

Christopher Ruddy: “First, most of the Bush tax cuts are not only renewed but are made permanent. The increase in the threshold from $250,000 to $400,000 for tax increases is a step in the right direction, and will certainly cover most working Americans.”

Charles Krauthammer: “[The deal is] a complete rout by the Democrats. There are a lot of conservatives in the Republican caucus in the House who hate the bill for good reason. This is a complete surrender on everything.”

Paul Ryan (R-Wis): “I joined my colleagues in the House to protect as many Americans as possible from a tax increase. We also provided certainty by making the lower tax rates permanent.”

The Wall Street Journal: “The Senate-White House compromise grudgingly passed by the House is a Beltway classic: the biggest tax increase in 20 years in return for spending increases /…/”

There is nothing like American politics

(Image source.)

The massive Republican effort

A summary and an update regarding the health care reform

For those who have not followed the American health care debate but are interested in a concise insight, CNN has published an article containing the highlights of President Barack Obama’s proposal:

“Obama’s proposal is a long way from becoming law. His proposal would need to be drafted into legislation, debated and passed by the House and Senate. As the past year has shown, health care is an emotional subject, and debate can drag on for months.Immediate reaction from Republicans suggests that this time around, it won’t be any easier.

‘Nearly one year ago, the president moderated a health care summit that kicked off a national debate that has led us to where we are today: a partisan bill devoid of support from the American people and a diminished faith in this government’s capacity to listen. Let’s not make the same mistake twice,’ Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said.

House Minority Leader John Boehner revived the abortion debate, saying, ‘Republicans are also standing with the American people by calling for health care reform to protect human life and not use taxpayer money to fund abortion. … Health care reform should be an opportunity to protect human life — not end it — and the American people agree.'”

And in case somebody would like an update on what options Mr Obama faces, and what the opportunities and risks are, Clive Crook had an excellent column in Financial Times the other day:

“Republican opposition to the Senate bill has been cynical and unprincipled. It is a scandal that not one Republican has been willing to speak up for a reform that, in the end, was a centrist proposal – much like the one that Mitt Romney, the party’s front-runner for the presidential nomination in 2012, signed as governor of Massachusetts. Blocking the reform was bad policy but good politics, because the reformers have failed to persuade the public. More confused and exhausted than anything else, voters are fearful of this legislation. That is why pressing on is such a gamble.

/…/

For that huge gamble to succeed, and to have any hope of staving off disaster in November, Mr Obama and his squabbling, tone-deaf, self-wounding party would then have to turn to the country and explain their plan. Odd, you might think, to have left that so late. Some traditions die hard. Even when they are right, Democrats have a knack for getting it wrong.For that huge gamble to succeed, and to have any hope of staving off disaster in November, Mr Obama and his squabbling, tone-deaf, self-wounding party would then have to turn to the country and explain their plan. Odd, you might think, to have left that so late. Some traditions die hard. Even when they are right, Democrats have a knack for getting it wrong.”

Simon Hedlin Larsson