Cass R. Sunstein and Simon Hedlin: Is greener always better?

Today I write in Los Angeles Times with Cass Sunstein of Harvard Law School about positive and negative stereotypes of environmentally friendly goods and services.

Simon Hedlin

Prostitution and sex trafficking paper

I have just accepted an offer to publish one of my papers on the relationship between prostitution laws and sex trafficking in the Michigan Journal of Law Reform.

Simon Hedlin

Paper published in Ecology Law Quarterly

A paper related to environmental law and behavioral economics that I have co-authored with Cass Sunstein of Harvard Law School has just been published in Ecology Law Quarterly.

Simon Hedlin

 

Journal of International Women’s Studies

I have recently joined the board of the Journal of International Women’s Studies (JIWS), an open-access, peer reviewed journal on gender issues, as an Editor. Check out the current issues here.

Simon Hedlin

How Marco Rubio proved the polls wrong

In another column in Swedish, I explain how Marco Rubio’s mastery of retail politics helped propel him to a strong third place in the Iowa caucus. In over fifty polls leading up to the Iowa contest, Rubio received over 20 percent in just one poll, and yet he ended up with 23 percent when the votes had finally been cast. The column can be found here.

Simon Hedlin

Review of “Soul Machine: The Invention of the Modern Mind”

In my latest article for The Economist, I review an interesting book about the notion that makes us human. An excerpt:

ABOUT a century and a half ago, an American railway worker named Phineas Gage was setting an explosive charge near Cavendish, Vermont. While he was tamping down the charge with an iron rod, it went off and sent the rod through his head. Gage miraculously survived—or least part of him did. But contemporaries thought that his personality had changed; where once he had been well-behaved, now he was downright antisocial. The incident raised questions about what constitutes the self and to what extent it is influenced by the body.

Although Phineas Gage is cited in medical and psychological literature as one of the earliest known cases of brain damage and personality change, the debate about what makes people human had, by then, already been going on for centuries. In “Soul Machine” George Makari, a psychiatry professor at Weill Cornell Medical College, presents an electrifying narrative of the intellectual disputes that gave rise to the Western conception of the mind.

Read the full piece here.

Simon Hedlin

Both Republicans and Democrats are pandering to public fear

Today I write in Sweden’s second largest morning newspaper, Svenska Dagbladet, about terrorism and gun violence, both of which are used by politicians to the left and the right to pander to public fear. The column can be found here.

Simon Hedlin